The Fitting Experiment: Sabrina Slims Edition

Hello, and welcome to 2020!!! I am excited to start the year off with a new series that I am working on in conjunction with a small group of blogging makers, like myself. We are calling this new adventure The Fitting Experiment, where we take a pattern, and we all sew one up, to show how each of us looks different in the pattern, and we all explain what modifications we had to make for our particular body’s many curves.

The first edition of this experiment involved Love Notions’ Sabrina Slims (aff), a slim fit cigarette pant that comes with all sorts of wonderful options. It has recently been updated to include a wider range of sizes.

I sewed up Love Notions’ Tabitha Top (aff) to go with these amazing pants. The Tabitha Top also comes with so many options to choose from, but I went with the boatneck collar and optional lace shirttail.

With pants, I worry about fit, and am well-prepared with my lists of tailoring options, but with the latest Sabrina Slims pattern, they fit me so well, straight as a muslin/toile; so I was able to head straight into my “good fabric” and cut out my plaid Ponte fabric that I had been hoarding for over a year.

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I made the Tabitha Top out of red stretch crushed velvet from Knitpop (aff) and the lace mesh that I used for the shirttail (that can be tucked in to give you another completely different look) was from Stitchin’ Pretties.

I chose the size 18 straight leg with front pockets option for my Sabrina Slims. I chose not to interrupt the back lines with the optional welt pockets. I think that next time, I will do the paneled version of the Sabrina Slims, to add an almost piped look to the front seams of the pants. Like I said, I was lucky, and they fit me well, but for additional tailoring for next time, I might decrease my pocket bag and hip by 1/4″ on each side and take about 1/4 out of the knee area, but that is just in Ponte and just for my specific curves. Everyone’s body is different, so we will all wear the pattern differently, as well.  

A special thank you to Love Notions for sponsoring The Fitting Experiment bloggers with patterns so that we can share our thoughts with you. Love Notions has kindly provided a 20% off shop discount code for all our readers. Please use this code at checkout: FittingEXPSabrinas

In addition, Love Notions has given us TWO copies of Sabrina Slims to giveaway. For a chance to win, comment below. For more chances to win, comment on the other blogs too! You can check out their posts below:

 

Breaking Ground with Phat Quarters Patterns


I was so lucky to be a part of the Breaking Ground Blog Tour this year, hosted Mahlica Designs and sponsored by Phat Quarters Patterns!

Inspired by Phat Quarters’ adorable patterns, I decided to break ground by hacking two of their patterns into adult sizes, as they currently only carry children’s sizes and patterns.

The first that I took from children’s sizes to an adult size was the Alderwood. It’s an amazing and unique pattern that has a cowl or hood option and lots of scrap-busting color blocking and piping opportunities.

Here is my finished plus-sized Women’s Alderwood:
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I used a brushed waffle knit for the majority of the bodice, and accented with quilted faux leather.

The process involves a few moments of math and resizing of each pattern piece, while taking into account things like women’s bust, waist, and hip differences from a child’s typical shape. Then, the fun begins!!

A note to all that seek to upsize a hack on a children’s pattern, remember that bodice adjustments need corresponding sleeve adjustments for shoulder width and armscye changes. Also, not every difference is a giant one. The piping on the Alderwood, for example, was almost the same size as the children’s pattern piece…but almost was still a change.

Next, I worked on the Camas, an AMAZING knit top that only seems like a basic T, until you see the opportunity for all of the bells and whistles that come with the pattern. I chose to mock one up with DBP from Amelia Lane Designs, and the fit was lovey and relaxed. I am going to do many more to cover all of the variations of the pattern, as each makes me giddy with anticipation.

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I can’t wait to break ground and sew up the rest of the Phat Quarters’ catalog in my size!!! (and to finally reveal a project that I’ve been working on for a few weeks! I am so excited! Stay tuned for exciting news and a giveaway!!)

Welcome to the Breaking Ground Blog Tour 2019 hosted by mahlicadesigns. This year over 25 bloggers from around the world are joining together to break new ground by trying a pattern designer that is new to them, try new techniques, new styles, or whatever way they want to push themselves. (Read on for Giveaway info)

The Full Tour includes all these creatives… we hope you’ll visit us each day:

Monday March 11That’s Sew Lily, Sewing A La Carte, Mijn 11jes & ik

Tuesday March 12mahlicadesigns, Embrace Everyday, Jot Designs, auschick sews, Raising Stripling Warriors

Wednesday March 13Musings of A Seamstress, Very Blissful, Sew4Five, Just Sew Something, Hazelnut Handmade, Crafting Through Time, Tales From A Southern Mom

Thursday March 14Make It Sew with the Bear and Pea Atelier, Ronda B Handmade, SequioaLynn Sews, Sewing with D, The Sewing Goatherd, OOYAmade, My Golden Thimble, Custom Made by Laura

Friday March 15Sew Cute Couture by Kathy, Sewing Novice, Ronda B Handmade, Momma Bear Sews, MeMade, My Golden Thimble, Lulu & Celeste

Breaking News: our tour sponsor Phat Quarters is offering 2 patterns of choice from her pattern shop to one lucky winner.

Enter Here!

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We’d love to see how you’re Breaking Ground this month. Share with us what you’re working on by using the hashtag #BreakingGround2019 across social media.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

We Gather Here Today in Thanksgiving…a gathering tutorial

As we get ever-nearer to the Thanksgiving holiday here in the US, I am frantically trying to juggle all that has to get done, including my outfit. I have decided that I NEED to sew up a¬†pattern that I own which requires gathering…a LOT of gathering, so I was thinking that maybe others would like to follow along as I give some hints and methods for gathering woven and knits.

Just so that everyone is on the same page, I am going to be demonstrating the techniques with a sewing machine, a serger, and explaining how one could even gather your fabric by hand sewing it. *gasp* Hand stitching isn’t everyone’s favorite method, but it works, if you are away from your machines or just prefer the analog life.

I am going to demonstrate these techniques with scrap fabric, so that the stitches can be clearly seen. With wovens and a home sewing machine, I recommend the two rows of parallel long straight stitches/basting stitches method. First, you sew 2 parallel rows of elongated (like a 4-5 length stitch) straight stitches (almost a basting stitch). **Don’t do a backstitch/locking stitch to start or end these rows of stitches.

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When you are done choose ONE ROW (I usually choose the top row) and make sure that you can gently pull the thread form BOTH ends. What you want to do is to gently pull from one side, predominantly, but will need to end pulling from the opposite side of the SAME thread/row (if you try to pull entirely from one side only, it could end with you pulling that thread completely out). Another choice that you have is to gather a little bit from the opposite side and tie a securing knot to keep it in place (or you could wait until the end, or live dangerously, if you know that you are going to sew over and secure both sides of the gather with your machine as it attaches to another pattern piece.

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Slowly inch from one side to the other, keeping in mind the gathering needs for that pattern (sometimes, it is only a few inches that have to be gathered at 50%, and sometimes it can be more or less of either of these measurements).

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When you are done gathering the entire piece, it can look as tightly gathered as this.

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This method can also be used on knits, but I recommend just gathering on your serger, if you have one, as it is a lot faster.

For gathering your fabric with a serger, there does exist a gathering foot for most sergers, but since a lot of people that I know do not own this, I am going to demonstrate this with a standard presser foot.

First, you want to adjust your serger settings. I choose to move my differential feed to 2.0 (from N) and stitch length to 4.0 (from 2). This allows for the machine to do all of the hard work for you.

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Next, I assist the gather by bunching up my fabric in an orderly manner so that it feeds through the serger at an enhanced gather rate. If you only need a 25% gather, you don’t need to do this.

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When it is done, it will look like this.

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Finally, I will demonstrate how easy it is to gather by hand. You have a lot more control with this method, but it can take longer, depending on the length of your gather (for the Emma, it is a very long gather, and about 3 tiers of it (meaning 3 different gathers around the entire circumference of the dress). Hand sewing is not going to be my go-to here for this project (but that’s a personal preference).

First, you will make sure that your thread is knotted and start your gathering stitch from the wrong side of the fabric.

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Next, you will sew your stitches and either stitch and pull gently to gather to your desired gathering percentage,

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…or gather the fabric on your needle to gather it as you go.

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When you are done, you just knot off the end on the wrong side, and you are done!

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If anyone has any questions about any of these techniques, please feel free to leave me a comment or find me on Facebook.com/JotDesigns and ask all the questions that you have. Thanks!! And I hope that your holiday gatherings are relaxing, peaceful, and filled with lots of love!